Thursday, 7 December 2017

Developing Web Pages with JavaScript

JavaScript is an extremely powerful tool for developing Web pages. There are a large number of significant applications using the JavaScript.
The complexity and power of applications that can be developed in JavaScript is almost unlimited.But there are certain situations in which the Java programming language may be a better solution, however.
JavaScript is a simpler language than Java, with fewer built-in functions, yet it is still extremely expressive.

Java has a much larger set of capabilities, yet it is also a bit more difficult to use.
If you have ever seen any Java code you have probably noticed that it bears a substantial resemblance to JavaScript. A large part of the Java language is identical to JavaScript.
There are several significant differences between Java and JavaScript that are critical in learning how to effectively use both tools. These differences can be grouped into the following three categories that are the object models,Interactions with the browser environment,and the Language differences.

In JavaScript you often create functions that are methods of your own objects. You are also perfectly free to have functions that are not methods.
Event handler functions are usually not method functions, for example. In Java, all functions must be methods of some object, and all variables must be properties of some object.

JavaScript objects are used to access the built-in mathematical, string, and date functions. JavaScript objects are also used to access and manipulate HTML elements inside JavaScript code.
Java takes this object-oriented approach even further. Everything in Java is based on objects and their properties and methods.

Netscape cookies are small strings of text stored in your cookies.txt file. They are often used to store information about you or your computer that is used by various sites to "remember" some bit of information about you between visits to that Web site.
The server writes this code to your machine and will reread it when you visit again. Although this feature is very useful, there are still debates as to its security and validity of use.