Thursday, 7 December 2017

Build Webpages with Most Sophisticated way

Frames are a sophisticated way to build Web pages; you can keep your menu in one frame and display your content in another.
However, it is easy to go overboard and have too many frames. If you present too much information in several different small frames, the user will probably be scrolling quite often.

Frames are one of the most important new features to be added to HTML. Frames allow multiple subwindows-or panes-in a single Web page. This gives you the opportunity to display several URLs at the same time, on the same Web page.

It also allows you to keep part of the screen constant while other parts are updated. This is ideal for many Web applications that span multiple pages, but also have a constant portion.

An interesting aspect of frames is revealed if you attempt to use the View Source option of Netscape Navigator. Only the code for the frameset appears-the code for the frames contained in it does not. This is one approach to provide some simple protection for your source code.

However, it only keeps novice users from seeing your code; experienced users can defeat this by loading the URLs referenced by the individual frames into a single browser window, and then using View, Source on that window.

Since the whole purpose of frames is to present information in a pleasing manner, it is important not to try the user's patience
We must always remember that the frames can be a powerful tool, but they should be used judiciously.

One of the most important, and most confusing, aspects of frames is the parent/child relationships of frames, framesets, and the windows that contain them. The first frameset placed in a window has that window as its parent.

A frameset also can host another frameset, in which case the initial frameset is the parent. Note that a top-level frameset itself is not named, but a frameset's child frames can be named. Frames can be referred to by name or as an index of the frames array.

Probably, the most widely used new feature provided by JavaScript is the capability to use multiple frames to organize Web site content, especially when used in conjunction with navigation and toolbars.

For many Web authors, this means converting existing pages and sites into a frame-based format. But it can be tricky. Although frames are a powerful new tool, if misplaced and misused they can be a hindrance to the user by eating up screen space and slowing down the browser.

The path=PATH parameter is used to limit the search path of a server that can see your cookies.
This is analogous to specifying a document BASE in an HTML document. If you use a slash (/), then everything in the domain can use your cookies.

The function makeYearExpDate() enables you to set the expiration date for several years in the future. It was designed for really persistent cookies. If you want a shorter time, you can easily modify this routine. Note that this function uses the Date object heavily.

The static method, Date.getTime(), returns a neatly formatted date string, while the method, Date.toGMTime(), returns the date converted to Greenwich Mean Time, which is what the cookie expiration mechanism expects your cookies to contain.

The function fixSep() escapes any semicolons that your variables might have. It is highly undesirable to store semicolons in the cookie parameters because the semicolon is the parameter separator.

You could, in fact, escape all the non-alphanumeric characters in the entire string. However, this would make it difficult to read, especially if you simply want to look at the cookie.

The frame named menuFrm will contain buttons to call your frameset functions. These functions must be able to refer to objects in their own frame as well as the adjacent frame editFrm. In addition, you must be able to call these functions from the parent frame. The true value of a frameset function library is its reusability.

It is easy to copy the HTML file that defines the library and create a new document by changing a small amount of code-the code that builds the frameset itself. In this way, you can reuse your code.